AIRWORTHINESS REVIEW CERTIFICATE

The conditions necessary for a C of A to remaining in force i.e. to keep the aircraft in a state of continued airworthiness. This is ensured by issuing c of a to an aircraft and subjecting the aircraft to annual ARC.
AIRWORTHINESS REVIEW CERTIFICATE
Aircraft Airworthiness Review: To ensure the validity of the ARC an airworthiness review of the aircraft and its continuing airworthiness records shall be carried out periodically. An ARC is issued on completion of a satisfactory airworthiness review is valid for one year;

In a controlled environment means aircraft (i) continuously managed during the previous 12 months by a unique CAMO G (ii) which has been maintained for the previous 12 months by Subpart F or with CAR 145.

1. Aircraft used in CAT, above 2 730 kg, are in a controlled environment, the CAMO may,
a) Issue an ARC
b) For the ARC it has issued, when the aircraft has remained within a controlled environment, extend twice the validity of the ARC for a period of one year each time;
2. Aircraft used in CAT, above 2730 kg, and not in a contr. envir, or which continuing airworthiness is managed by a CAMO that does not hold the privilege to carry out airworthiness reviews, the ARC shall be issued by DGCA upon satisfactory assessment based on a recommendation made by a CAMO sent together with the application from the owner or operator.
3. For aircraft non CAT of 2730 kg and below, CAMO may,
a) Issue the ARC;
b) For ARC it has issued, when the aircraft has remained within a controlled environment under its management, extend twice the validity of the airworthiness review certificate for a period of one year each
4. For aircraft that are in a controlled environment, the CAMO, may extend twice for a period of one year each time the validity of an ARC that has been issued by DGCA or by another CAMO
Light aircraft not used in CAT and not affected by com non CAT, >The ARC may also be issued by DGCA upon satisfactory assessment, >based on a recommendation made by certifying staff formally approved by DGCA and >complying with DGCA AML requirements as well as requirements of M.A.707(a)2(a), >sent together with the application from the owner or operator. >This recommendation shall be based on an airworthiness review carried out in accordance with point M.A.710 and shall not be issued for more than two consecutive years.

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Review of aircraft records

The review of aircraft records shall confirm that the aircraft in its current configuration complies with the following:

  1. 1. airframe, engine and propeller flying hours and flight cycles have been properly recorded, and;
  2. 2. all known defects have been corrected or, when applicable, carried forward in a controlled manner, and;
  3. 3. airworthiness directives up to the latest published issue, and;
  4. 4. Type certificate data sheet (by number and issue), and;
  5. 5. Maintenance programme, and;
  6. 6. Component service life limitations, and;
  7. 7. The valid weight and centre of gravity schedule reflecting the current configuration of the aircraft, and;
  8. 8. Part 21 for all modifications and repairs, and;
  9. 9. The current flight manual (to the latest revision status) including supplements, and;
  10. 10. All maintenance has been released in accordance with Part 145, and;
  11. 11. Operational requirements.

Planning of tasks, equipment and spare parts

The absence of effective planning can contribute towards increased work pressure. Work pressure itself may lead to deviation from procedures. Deviation from procedures is well known as a contributing factor in many aircraft incidents.
The AMO should give due importance and clarify the objective of good planning. Advisory and explanatory material should include further guidance on elements to consider when establishing the planning procedure.
The AMO must have a system appropriate to the amount and complexity of work to plan the availability of all necessary personnel, tools, equipment, material, maintenance data and facilities in order to ensure the safe completion of the maintenance work.
Depending on the amount and complexity of work generally performed by the maintenance organization, the planning system may range from a very simple procedure to a complex organizational set-up including a dedicated planning function in support of the production function.
The production planning function should include two complementary elements:
1.Scheduling the maintenance work ahead to ensure that it will not adversely interfere with other maintenance work as regards the availability of all necessary personnel, tools, equipment, material, maintenance data and facilities; and
2. During maintenance work, organizing maintenance teams and shifts and providing all necessary support to ensure the completion of maintenance without undue time pressure

When establishing the production planning procedure, consideration should be given to the following:
1.logistics 2.inventory control; 3.square meters of accommodation 3.estimation of man-hours 4.availability of man-hours 5.preparation of work 6.Hangar availability 7. coordination with internal and external suppliers, etc. 8. Scheduling of safety-critical tasks during periods when staff are likely to be most alert.

DGCA/McCAULEY/18r1

FAA AD 2010-04-05 McCauley Propeller Systems 1A103/TCM Series Propellers

  1. AD requires, for certain serial numbers (S/Ns)of McCauley Propeller Systems A103 /TCM series propellers, initial and repetitive visual and dyepenetrant inspections for cracks in the propeller hub, replacement of propellers with cracks that do not meet acceptable limits, and rework of propellers with cracks that meet acceptable limits
  2. AD requires, for all McCauley Propeller Systems 1A103/TCM series propellers, the same actions but at reduced compliance times.
    1. This AD also requires inspections of the bolt holes, reaming holes if necessary, and inspections of steel reinforcement plates and gaskets

5         AD  issued to prevent propeller separation due to hub fatigue cracking, which can result in loss of control of the aeroplane

6        AD 2003-12-05 required inspections starting at 3,000 operating hours TIS

7.  McCauley ASB221E, dated January 28, 2010 describes, for all McCauley  1A103 /TCM series propellers, procedures for initial and repetitive visual and dyepenetrant inspections for cracks in the propeller hub, removal from service of propellers with cracks that do not meet acceptable limits, and rework of propellers with cracks that meet acceptable limits

Applicability = McCauley 1A103/TCM series propellers, all serial numbers.

Initial Inspection of Propellers Not Previously Inspected

(f) For propellers not previously inspected using McCauley SB No. 221C,dated September 7, 1999, or ASB221D, dated January 28, 2008, do the following:

(1) For propellers with more than 1,500 operating hours time-since-new (TSN) or unknown operating hours TSN on the effective date of this AD, within the next 50 op TIS

(2) For propellers with 1,500 or fewer operating hours TSN on the effective date of this AD, upon reaching 1,500 operating hours TSN or within the next 50 operatinTIS

Initial Inspection of Propellers Previously Inspected

(g) For propellers previously inspected using McCauley SB No. 221C, dated September 7,1999, or McCauleyASB221D, dated January 28, 2008, do the following:

(1) For propellers with more than 1,500 operating hours TSN on the effective date of this AD, and with 750 or more operating hours time-since-last-inspection (TSLI), within the next 50 operating hours TIS, do the actions specified in paragraphs (h) through (m) of this AD.

(2) For propellers with more than 1,500 operating hours TSN on the effective date of this AD, and with fewer than 750 operating hours TSLI, before reaching 750 operating hours TSLI or within the next 50 operating hours TIS, whichever occurs later, do the actions specified in paragraphs (h)through (m) of this AD.

(h) Visual- and dye-penetrate-inspect for cracks in the propeller hub.

(i) Inspect the bolt holes and ream the holes if necessary.

(j) Inspect the steel reinforcement plates and gaskets.

(k) Remove propellers that are not within the bolt hole inspection limits or have cracks that are not within the rework limits.

(l) Rework propellers that have cracks that meet acceptable rework limits.

(m) Use the Accomplishment Instructions of McCauley ASB No. ASB221E, dated January 28,2010, to do the inspections, rework, and removals from service. Repetitive Propeller Inspections

(n) Thereafter, for all propellers, within every additional 750 operating hours TIS perform the actions in paragraphs (h) through (m) of this AD.

ASB221E January 28, 2010

INSPECTION OF MODEL 1A103/TCM PROPELLER HUB FOR CRACKING AND REWORK PROCEDURES

MODELS AFFECTED 1A103/TCM (All Serial Numbers)

REASON–McCauley has received reports of cracks in the 1A103/TCM model propeller hub. Cracks have been found on the camber side of the propeller hub near the mounting bolt holes. These crack(s) have been observed primarily in areas where fretting is present around propeller mounting bolt holes.

COMPLIANCE MANDATORY

All inspection and replacement requirements must be done at the compliance times and intervals shown below.

1. For propellers with 1500 hours or more total time in service or if the propeller total time in service unknown:

a) Inspection and rework procedures must be done within the next 50 hours of service.

NOTE: For propellers that have previously been inspected in accordance with SB 221C or  ASB221D, compliance with the initial inspection requirements of  ASB221E is not required.

2. For propellers with less than 1500 hours total time in service:

a) Inspection and rework procedures must be done at 1500 hours total time in service or within the next 50 hours of service, whichever occurs later.

3. Repetitive Inspections:

a) After completing the initial inspection of the propeller, steel reinforcement plate, and mylar gasket, repetitive inspections must be accomplished every 36 calendar months or every 750 hours of service, whichever occurs first.

SERVICE BULLETIN SB137AE February 17, 2010                                                                                                     

REVISED TIME BETWEEN OVERHAUL (TBO) and LIFE LIMITED PARTS SPECIFICATIONS

Fixed Pitch Propellers                           P.

3AF32C507                                           D

D. 2000 hours or 72 calendar months, whichever occurs first, except:

P. Fixed pitch propellers – 2000 hours or 72 calendar months which ever occurs first*.

Additionally,1. The propeller mounting bolt torque should be checked at least once per year.                                    2. Propeller mounting bolts must be magnetic particle inspected in accordance with ASTM E-1444 or liquid penetrant inspected in accordance with ASTM E-1417 or replaced at every overhaul.                                                                             3.Propeller mounting bolts must be replaced whenever the propeller is involved in a blade strike as defined in Service Bulletin 176[X].

(2) *For 1A103/TCM [XXXX] propellers only, the overhaul frequency is every 1500 hours of operation or 72 calendar months, whichever occurs first.                                                                  All propellers with 1500 or more hours total time in service must be inspected in accordance with Alert Service Bulletin 221[X] every 750 hours of operation or 36 calendar months whichever occurs first